Category: Human Resources (HR) Resources

22 Oct 2018

Managing the workplace zombie by Debra Fraser

“I see dead people”. At work. Duppies, zombies, ghosts, whichever term you prefer. People who are there but not really there…or are they? (Cue spooky music…).

Workplace zombies are those who are disengaged from their companies and their jobs, but still show up for work. They clock-in and clock-out. Present in body but not in spirit; listlessly satisfying the requirements or ‘letter’ of the job, but avoiding any spirited connection with the company’s purpose, mission and people. They were once ‘fully human’, bringing their energy, ideas, and genuine loyalty to their place of work and teams. So what happened to them? What force sapped the life out of these formerly productive souls?

Reasons

As a research project of interest, I had my team conduct a survey to find out what drives individuals to jump off the bridge into zombie-ism. Here are some of the common reasons:

• “The company doesn’t care about me”

This sentiment is voiced by workers who held the company in high esteem when they first joined the organisation. Over time, however, an event or series of events occurred in which the employee’s high expectations were not met. For example, a manager fails to respond fairly or compassionately to an employee’s legitimate personal crisis or need. The employee disengages, emotionally, but due to the monetary rewards, continues to show up to work.

 

• “I don’t like the type of job I’m in”

Here, the employee accepted the job, and after some time, discovered that it does not fit his/her natural abilities and expectations. Due to the unavailability of a ‘better’ job, the employee disengages, mentally, but continues to show up to work until a new opportunity, or funds to attend training for the new opportunity, presents itself.

• “I’m not rewarded fairly for my job”

Here, the individual believes that the pay received is not commensurate with the work performed, so in short, they are being ripped off. Disengagement occurs and ‘another one bites the dust’.

Why should companies care about zombie-ism or seek to combat it? Because it costs them, literally! Several studies have shown that disengaged workers, similar to sick workers (google “Presenteeism”), who still come in to work perform at a slower pace, make more errors, and negatively impact the productivity of their coworkers. The net result is that the company would be more profitable if both sick and disengaged workers stayed home until they were well, or resurrected!

The discussion on workplace zombies continues this week as the Jamaica Business Development Commission hosts its annual Employee Engagement Conference, an event where hundreds of Jamaica’s CEOs and decision-makers meet to discuss the causes, impact and responses of having an engaged workforce.

Debra Fraser MBA, is CEO of Caribbean HR Solutions, and is a board memberof the Business Process Industry Association of Jamaica, and a member ofthe Human Resource Management Association of Jamaica as well as theSociety of Human Resources Management. Please direct comments todfraser@caribbeanhrsolutions.com or www.caribbeanhrsolutions.com

Please follow and like us:
18 Oct 2018

5 Skills to adopt to effectively manage your staff

The essence of effective leadership is motivating your team to consistently perform while instilling a desire to improve, as well as cultivate employee loyalty to colleagues, yourself and, ideally, the company. It can seem daunting, but it doesn’t have to be if you approach it with the right attitude and priorities.

Here are 5 skills to adopt to effectively manage your staff

  1. Communicate intelligently. Some managers mistakenly believe that barking orders and instilling fear in your staff are the hallmarks of managerial success. But if this is your strategy, you’re likely to only succeed in creating a unmotivated, antagonized staff.

Instead, take the time to learn how to effectively communicate with each of your employees. Indeed, some may require firm, though respectful, directives, while others will respond best to a soft tone and congenial attitude. Adjust your management style to each employee, and don’t expect them to conform to yours.

Regardless of how you communicate, the one thing that must remain consistent is that you are straightforward and honest. Don’t try to beat around the bush or avoid explaining exactly what the problem is. For example, is the cash flow of your business not being accurately recorded? Then explain the issue to those responsible and let them know you will hold them accountable for the areas that you pinpoint.

  1. Accept responsibility. Simply put, if you make a mistake, own up to it. Don’t be tempted to pass the blame onto employees if it’s your error, as this can cause you to lose credibility and trust with your staff.

However, if you accept responsibility for your own errors, your staff is more likely to respect and support you, and therefore will work harder for you. Once you’ve taken responsibility, proactively address your mistake to correct it and to ensure that it doesn’t happen again.

  1. Deal with confrontation. Whether it’s confronting lagging performance or inter-office disputes, it’s up to you to set limits and maintain a harmonious working environment. If you don’t have the wherewithal to address issues directly, consider hiring someone specifically trained in executive coaching to help you navigate.
  2. Praise—and reward—your staff. If your sales figures reached or exceeded expectations last month, don’t bask in the glory alone. Acknowledge all who had a hand in the success. Nothing motivates like praise and rewards, and there are multiple ways you can reward your staff without breaking the bank. For instance, you can take the top-performing employees out on an exclusive offsite at your weekend home, get tickets to a sporting event or concert, or even a night on the town. Building this kind of rapport can reap huge rewards for building momentum and loyalty.
  3. Know when to speak up. If you’re comfortable handling confrontation, you’re likely comfortable presenting an opinion contrary to the status quo. Show enthusiasm for your ideas and point to your track record as a leader and successful entrepreneur, and you should have your staff trusting in your abilities.Still, judging when it’s appropriate to speak up requires tact. The last thing you want to do is insult your staff or condescend. Also, be honest with yourself, and detach your ego from the ideas you present. If your suggestion is passed over, don’t take it personally. You employ a team of professionals in whom you trust, and if they advise against your ideas or initiatives, it may be in your best interests to heed their advice.

Maintaining an awareness of office politics can also help you know if it’s appropriate to interject your point of view, and when. One way to do this is to encourage an “open door policy” in which your employees feel empowered to speak up in meetings with you or send an e-mail when there are team issues.

Read more

https://www.americanexpress.com/us/small-business/openforum/articles/top-5-skills-for-effective-employee-management/

Please follow and like us:
11 Oct 2018

Why Employers Use Psychometric Assessments

What Are Psychometric Assessments

According to the Institute of Psychometric Coaching, “Psychometric tests are a standard and scientific method used to measure individuals’ mental capabilities and behavioral style.” These tests, identify if the candidate is a suitable fit for the role that they are applying for. Employers will use psychometric tests to identify specific attributes of the potential employee that would have been hard to determine from a face-to-face interview.

Why use Psychometric Assessments

There are many why employers will choose to use psychometric assessments. Here are 4 of the top reasons.

  • Helps to ensure you are hiring the right employee for the company

The main benefit of using psychometric assessments is to ensure that you are hiring the right person for the role that you are trying to fill. Psychometric assessments add a measure of standardization and objectivity to the recruiting process that would assist in removing the unconscious bias that is present in the selection process.

  • Easy to read reports

The results of the psychometric assessments are generally easy to read using simplified and the employer can easily go through the results to gain information about the candidate.

  • Creates a positive image of the company:

Help to boost the company reputation. Employees are attracted to these modern recruiting practices as they will give each applicant a fair and equal opportunity for the role. As such, the employer is able to attract top talent.

  • It helps shape your HR strategy

HR relies on a number of different inputs to make decisions with company-wide effects. Psychometric tools can be used an objective data point that can assist in shaping the HR strategy. When it is coupled with the individual job performance information, the psychometric test results can be indicators to help companies with selection, talent management, assessing workforce capability, employee engagement, understanding organizational culture and succession planning with a high degree of confidence.

 

Sources

https://www.psychometricinstitute.com.au/Psychometric-Guide/Introduction_to_Psychometric_Tests.html.

Night Sky App

 

Please follow and like us:
04 Oct 2018

Why you need to improve your candidate experience?

Traditionally the job/labour market would favor the employer. There were few GOOD jobs and multiple candidates. Many companies had the liberty of posting a good job and receiving dozens of great qualified candidates; put these candidates through the hiring process at your companies pace and then make an offer – hiring process complete. However, all things must come to an end and looking at the current job market it is the complete opposite. Many companies are hiring and the top candidates are now the ones in demand and not the company. So how does this affect companies in 2018? Candidates are now choosing their employers and the time-consuming rigorous hiring methods that were previously so successful will not work in securing a top-level candidate.

The hiring model that was previously used in years gone back are therefore ineffective to be used now and if companies want to remain competitive in the hiring process, it is necessary therefore for them to adjust their hiring model, if not already done.

Why is it important?

Candidate experience during the hiring process is now becoming increasingly important for companies.  Potential candidates share their hiring experiences online and in-person particularly if they are bad. These negative reviews can prevent others from applying for roles within the company and will ultimately affect the company’s hiring goals as well as its objectives. One Forbes report indicated that “the candidate experience during the recruitment process not only determines their willingness to join the company, it also shapes the relationship they have with the brand and their willingness to make purchases from a company longer-term.” Bad candidate experiences can even impact the financial gain for the employer.

It was identified by Forbes article that given that the job market is the way it currently is “Often the best people are being recruited by multiple companies simultaneously. By improving the total candidate journey and creating positive moments of surprise within it, a company creates an opportunity for itself to achieve differentiation and to convert the best candidates into new hires when all else is equal.” If companies hope to remain competitive and retain the best talent it is important that their candidates have a positive candidate experience. As the saying goes first impressions last.

So how do we change our hiring process

A complete change of the recruiting and hiring process would require investments in both time and resources and might not seem feasible right now. Here are a few of the tips suggested in the Forbes article Here’s why you need to improve your company’s candidate journey – and how to make it better.

  • Identify all candidate experience touchpoints – It should identify every point along the entire talent acquisition process; everything from brand discovery to job descriptions, the online application, telephone and in-person interviews, the job offer – all the way through onboarding activities.
  • Analyze the current situation – Find out how good (or bad) your company is at each contact point along the candidate journey. Use surveys, interviews and speak with recently hired employees to assess the current situation.
  • Determine areas for improvement – Rate your company in each area of the candidate journey to discover the areas needing the most improvement. Then, determine where you can make the biggest impact, how long it will take and the resources necessary (people, technology tools and budget).
  • Dedicate qualified resources –To improve the candidate journey experience, dedicate enough qualified resources and budget. Especially helpful are resources who have marketing/communications and branding experience and who also have in-depth knowledge of HR, expertise in process improvement techniques and are tech-savvy.

Read more

 

Please follow and like us:
27 Sep 2018

Why use an Administrative Service Organization (ASO)

What is an ASO

An Administrative Service Organization (ASO) is an organization that provides administrative and human resources services for its clients; this is a simple way to outsource tasks that can be more efficiently handled outside the company. ASOs can provide a variety of services for your company, including the following:

  • Payroll – direct deposit, W-2 processing, tax filing, reports, 401(k) administration and other tasks
  • Human resources – employee newsletters, help desk, handbooks, file maintenance, employee surveys, background checks, recruiting and other service options
  • Employee benefits – benefits enrollment, payment and premiums, COBRA administration and more

Difference between ASO and PEO

ASOs differ from professional employer organizations (PEOs), which provide a more comprehensive package of services and include a co-employment arrangement. The co-employment arrangement in a PEO contract means that the PEO becomes the employer of record and the PEO assumes some or all of the risks and liabilities related to employment.

Should I use an ASO

Whether or not an ASO is right for your company depends on several factors. First, you need to consider whether you want or need to outsource administrative and HR tasks. If so, do you need a full-service contract or just a few tasks handled for you? If you’re looking for a complete package of services and are willing to enter a co-employment agreement, a PEO may be a better choice. ASOs might be the favored option if you want to keep more employment control and need to choose only a few services to outsource.

Looking for ASOs in Jamaica? Contact us at 1-876-971-7632 or email us at sales@caribbeanhrsolutions.com.

Read more

http://clarkandassoc.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/09/HR-Insights-Adminstrative-Service-Organizations.pdf

Please follow and like us:
24 Sep 2018

Big up, boss ladies! by Debra Fraser

On Friday, September 21 we celebrated Business Women’s Day… well, hopefully at least some of us did. It was an opportunity to celebrate the value female leaders bring to the world of work, especially considering the powerful legacy of lady leadership (the Triple L factor) woven into the fabric of Jamaica’s heritage.

But what’s the difference in lady leadership? And what makes it special? Though the impact is wide, let’s take a look at just a couple of ways boss ladies impact business from the HR and engagement perspective.

Women have a powerful influence on workplace cultures. A 2017 study indicates that companies with a higher number of women in leadership experience benefits in two key areas: employee engagement and employee wellness.

In the case of the former, it showed that employees in companies with a higher percentage of women gave higher satisfaction ratings on several items related to job satisfaction, organisational dedication, and employee engagement. In the case of the latter, the survey indicated that employees in companies with female bosses felt more supported and experienced less job-related burnout.

In recognition of Business Women’s Day, I’d like to practise self-awareness and reflect on a few of the special businesswomen who, over the years have figured out how to engage me. As it goes with women, it is likely that they may not be aware of the profound and practical impact they have had on someone else’s life, so let’s hope a little recognition will go a long way.

Big up, Lindsay Mohan, my college instructor whose individual attention, gentle prodding and hand-holding turned me around from being an underachieving student to a forever honour-roller. Now that’s engagement!

Big up, Emily Hodgkinson, my first manager who gave me a chance to practise HR in spite of the fact that I had only a few HR courses under my belt, and then created space for me to stretch my wings. I am your lady leadership legacy!

Big up, Betty Lawrence, whose consistent priority of service to God and community impact inspires her work and mine. Thanks for opening the YES youth centre and for the opportunity to volunteer with you!

Big up, Holly Lynch, HR executive in the US, who showed me what a combination of a high IQ plus business savvy compassion+ class looks like in a female executive.

And biggest-big-up to Gladys Fraser (my mom) who, as a working mother and first lady now turned ordained pastor and businesswoman, modelled the grace and rewards of “banding your belly” so that other bellies could be made full.

Is there a woman who has made an impact on your work life and career development? It’s not too late to call and big them up!

After all, that’s what Business Women’s Day is for.

Until next time, leaders, keep lookin’ up!

 

Debra Fraser MBA, is CEO of Caribbean HR Solutions, a board member of the Business Process Industry Association of Jamaica, and a member of the Human Resource Management Association of Jamaica, as well as the Society of Human Resources Management. Please direct comments to dfraser@caribbeanhrsolutions.com or www.caribbeanhrsolutions.com

 

Read more

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/career-education/big-up-boss-ladies-_144915?profile=1270#disqus_thread

Please follow and like us:
14 Sep 2018

What should I put in my employee handbook?

In our previous article, we looked at why should I create an employee handbook. This week we want to look at what should be included in an Employee Handbook.

Here are a few topics should be included in an employee handbook:

Introduction – Begin the handbook by describing your company’s history and business philosophy.

Hours –  State the normal working hours for full-time employees, rules for part-time employees, and how overtime compensation can be authorized for those entitled to it.

Pay and salaries – Be clear on how you set pay and salaries and how you raise them. Also, explain any bonus programs.

Benefits – Explain the rules relating to benefits, including vacation pay, sick pay, unpaid leave, and so on. For programs run by an outside provider, such as health benefits, other insurance benefits, and retirement benefits, refer employees to the official plan documents that explain the rules.

Drug and alcohol abuse – Many businesses have a policy prohibiting employees from using drugs or alcohol in the workplace. Some require drug testing; some offer to help employees deal with substance abuse through counseling or employee assistance programs. Include this information in your handbook.

Harassment – Use your handbook to remind employees that sexual and other types of harassment are illegal and violate your policies. Let them know that you will not tolerate unwelcome sexual comments or conduct and that you will treat any complaints of harassment seriously. Specify how and to whom an employee can complain of harassment, what procedures you will follow to investigate complaints, and what actions will be taken against harassers.

Attendance – Emphasize the importance of good attendance and showing up on time. Explain that numerous unexplained absences or repeated tardiness can be a basis for disciplinary action or even firing.

Discipline – Explain the types of conduct can get employees in trouble — for example, theft, violence, repeated performance problems, or fighting. Be sure to let your employees know that this is not an exclusive list and that you always reserve the right to decide to discipline or fire an employee.

Employee safety – State that employee safety is a major concern of your business and that employees are expected to follow safety rules and report any potentially dangerous conditions.

Complaints – Let employees know what procedures they should follow to make and resolve complaints. Designate several people in the company to receive employee complaints, and state that there will be no retaliation against any employee for filing a complaint. Having — and enforcing — a written complaint procedure can help shield your business from liability if an employee later sues for illegal harassment or discrimination.

Electronic communications – Include your company policies on use of email, the Internet, social networking sites, blogs, and so on. Because you may have to read employee communications (for example, if one employee accuses another of sending harassing email), your policy must tell employees that their communications may be read and are not private. If you monitor employee communications, say so.

Workplace civility – State that employees at all levels of the company are expected to treat each other with respect and that the success of the business depends on cooperation and teamwork among all employees.

Do you have a company handbook? Have you reviewed it recently to ensure your policies are updated? Do you need help creating an employee handbook?

Caribbean HR Solutions is Caribbean’s premier HR Outsourcing company providing your HR needs. Email or Call us today for assistance with updating or creating your employee handbook or any other HR related service. Contact us at 1-876-971-7632 or sales@caribbeanhrsolutions.com.

 

Taken from

https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/employee-handbook-benefits-30207.html

Please follow and like us:
10 Sep 2018

Why Employee Engagement is Not Working Part 2 by Debra Fraser

In last month’s issue, we identified that: “The average person would rather have a great boss looking out for them than prizes, trinkets and parties”. Improving productivity is directly linked to employees’ engagement with… their boss! So, if you are a leader who is cognisant of the power of your role and who wants to make a difference, what is the single most important thing you can do to ensure you are part of the solution, and not the source of the problem?

Become more self-aware.

Unsurprisingly, many ‘bad bosses’ actually believe they are fantastic leaders. The problem is, they are significantly disconnected from their employees’ perception of them.

Remember Psychology 101: the Johari box? Created by two psychologists in 1955, this theory is a technique that helps people better understand their relationship with themselves and others. Each person’s self-awareness falls into four quadrants, as per the image below.

 

The challenge “terrible” bosses have is that much of their interactions fall in the “Blind” box. For example: during the busiest time of the day a manager appears on the production floor, shouting work-hard mantras meant to ‘encourage’ staff to hit their goals. He believes he is showing support for the teams ‘in the trenches’. Meanwhile, his staff perceives his ‘ranting’ as annoying, distracting and part of his typical ‘hands-off’ approach. The result? Staff absenteeism increases during peaks, productivity goals are missed, and there is unwanted turnover. Imagine the improvements in productivity and employee engagement if that manager were aware of the impact his approach had on his staff, instead of acting out of the blind box where everyone (including the company purse) loses!

But whose responsibility is it to make the manager aware? Is it the manager’s? Human resources’? The staff’s? Newsflash: staff will rarely volunteer feedback to their boss for obvious reasons, unless the leader genuinely solicits it and creates a safe environment for staff to share.

Leaders: Asking staff for feedback on YOU is the most important thing you can do to increase your own self-awareness and leadership effectiveness.

This week’s challenge: Ask your employees: “On a scale of 1-10, rate my leadership style.” Solicit the presence of a human resource representative to make it a ‘safe space’. Ensure you LISTEN and avoid any statement of self-defence. Then, each time you receive a rating lower than eight, ask the follow-up question: “What would I need to do differently to make that number a 10?” Don’t wait for your company’s annual employee satisfaction survey to show you up. Take the initiative to find out where your gaps are and then address them. In this way, you will have better served yourself, your staff, and your company.

Until next time, leaders keep lookin’ up!

 

Debra Fraser MBA, is CEO of Caribbean HR Solutions; a board member of the Business Process Industry Association of Jamaica; a member of the Human Resource Management Association of Jamaica, and Society of Human Resources Management. Please direct comments to dfraser@caribbeanhrsolutions.com or www.caribbeanhrsolutions.com

Read more

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/career-education/fun-activities-and-prizes-do-not-the-engaged-employee-make-part-2_143704?profile=1096

Please follow and like us:
06 Sep 2018

Why should my company create an employee handbook?

An employee handbook is a great manual to give to new and current employees so that they understand the company’s mission, values, and norms. It will outline for the employees the company expectations in every aspect from the dress code to employee benefits to conduct policy. Creating a company employee handbook will have many benefits for your organization.

Here are five reasons your organization should have an employee handbook:

  1. Introduces your Employees to your culture, and values

The employee handbook will serve to introduce these employees to your company culture and will help them to determine where they fit in. This will aid in creating a sense of pride and belonging, which allows employees to become more productive in a shorter period of time. For the employee, this aspect of the handbook will answer questions such as

“How did the company get here?”

“How do we set ourselves apart from others?”

“What are the company interests?”

“How can the new hire become integrated into the company culture?”

 

  1. Informs employees of the company expectations

The handbook will provide a clear outline to the employees of their responsibilities. In addition, the handbook will also guide the employee as it relates to the companies policies and procedures. These include (but not limited to):

  • The procedures for requesting time off or a holiday.
  • Procedures for unscheduled absence (sickness), whom they should contact, and what the timing should be.
  • The key people in the company to turn to if they have any questions or concerns.
  • Expectations regarding employee behaviour
  • Employee dress code (e.g. uniform or casual Fridays)
  1. Ensures key company policies are clearly and consistently communicated

The handbook should accurately inform your employees about your company’s policies regarding employment, conduct and behavior, compensation and other policies and procedures that they should follow. It will serve as a referenceable resource for managers when answering questions or making decisions by ensuring that they remain consistent with existing policies and procedures.

  1. Informs employees about their benefits

Does your company offer paid lunch breaks, health insurance, paid maternal leave or any other benefits to employees?  The employee handbook will ensure that employees are aware of the benefits that are available and eligibility.

  1. Provides a defense against employee claims

For many employers, the challenge of a lawsuit from current or former employers is a real possibility. Once this challenge occurs, however, one of the most important documents that the employer can present to their attorney is a copy of the handbook. A well-written handbook will demonstrate that the company would have exercised “reasonable care” towards its handbook. The employee’s signed acknowledgement page of the handbook will show that the employee had an opportunity to familiarize themselves with the organization’s policies, a chance to ask related questions, knew whom they could turn to for help within the organization, and agreed to follow the terms and conditions of employment set forth by the organization.

 

Do you have a company handbook? Have you reviewed it recently to ensure your policies are updated? Do you need help creating an employee handbook?

Caribbean HR Solutions is Caribbean’s premier HR Outsourcing company providing your HR needs. Email or Call us today for assistance with updating or creating your employee handbook or any other HR related service. Contact us at 1-876-971-7632 or sales@caribbeanhrsolutions.com.

 

Please follow and like us:
27 Aug 2018

Launching Leaders: How to spot the leader-in-hiding by Debra Fraser

It is no mystery that one of our nation’s challenges is related to our ability to deploy a bench strength of leaders – leaders are in demand for public and private service, in social, business and even spiritual affairs. After all, if we are going somewhere (somewhere better), someone must lead us.

For those heading organizations, how does one go about discovering potential new leaders, anyways?  Do you look for personality, education, work ethic, passion, creativity? Or perhaps good looks? Years ago, a middle manager who reported to me commented on the humble car I was driving (a 1999 Honda Accord LX, which I still own and love!). This young aspiring leader said: “You know, you have to upgrade your car because it’s just not motivating me to aspire to move up the ladder!  You should be driving a bimma!” Needless to say, his expectation of what a leader should be initially took me by surprise. Perhaps we should add yet another characteristic of leaders: “Must Drive Fancy Cars!”  Ahhh, don’t we wish it was that simple…

Since before the rise of the Industrial Revolution, this matter of selecting leaders has been asked over and over.  Peter Drucker, known as the ‘founder’ of modern management point out that “productivity of work is not the responsibility of the worker but of the manager.”  So if you are a business owner, finding the next leader is crucial to the success and sustainability of your business.  Here are a few guidelines that can take the mystery out of your search for the next leader:

Potential leaders are marked by the following in their daily activity:

  1. They put Integrity first, and here’s what it looks like. Integrity is not an airy-fairy concept.  It means the candidate has a keen sense of what is right which is demonstrated in how he treats co-employees and the company’s customers.  H/she will naturally approach business decision making by weighing how to ‘do-right’ by the customer, the employee, the Company and the community. This habit by yield’s a consistent reliable approach and by it’s very nature engender TRUST, the very thing that keeps customers loyal, employees from leaving, and curries favor from stakeholders including those in the wider community.  That’s measurable value!
  2. They thrive on being the one held accountable; not necessarily the one in charge. I recently performed a stay interview with one of my own staff members, asking her to describe her ideal job and work environment. “Ideally, do you prefer to work behind the scenes, or as part of the team, or do you prefer to be the ‘front man’ who own the success or failures of projects and initiatives?” She shook her head vigorously at the notion of being the one in front, and I appreciated her honesty and candor (BTW, she is an excellent SME and a high-performer).  Her response is a reminder of the innate differences in passion and desire residing in each person.  Your next leader is the one who assumes responsibility whenever there’s a mess so that s/he can lead the clean up effort!
  3. They place a high value on Relationships. As the old adage says all “Business moves at the speed of trust” and if this is the case, relationships are both the fuel and the machine!  Let’s face it, Customer Relations, Employee Relations, Community and general communications are all based on managing relationships.  Looking for a Leader?  Look for the person who naturally keeps commitments to his peers, seeks for clarification and understanding when changes are rolling out, and who values the voice and experience of others, genuinely.

These are indicators that can be spotted in persons day-to-day routine.  They are internal characteristics that indicate who they are as a person in the NOW, so there is no guesswork in how they will act once they are given the title.  And less guesswork = less risk, which is always good for business.

 

Read more

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/career-education/how-to-spot-the-leader-in-hiding_142421?profile=1270

Please follow and like us: