Tag: hr

24 Sep 2019

What’s love got to do with it?

For the new generation of workers, company loyalty is often a fluid notion; a commodity to be traded to the highest bidder. Employers of choice must therefore be mindful of the cost and customer service implications of high attrition rates and try to mitigate this by ensuring that their pay and benefits package is attractive. It’s especially important when employees see the company growing and being profitable but don’t see it reflecting in their salaries. Recognition programmes and company perks can only go so far, and it’s not like they are considered legal tender at the supermarket.

WHEN YOU DO WHAT YOU LOVE…

Some say the sweet spot is when you get well-paid to do something you’d probably consider doing for free anyway. Take for example an executive buyer whose job is to travel the world, shopping in the most exciting cities, purchasing designer wear. Who wouldn’t want that job, right?

However, any human resource (HR) professional can also attest that in order to keep employees happy and engaged at the end of the day, they must have enough disposable income to save, pay for school, or buy a house or car. In this regard, job satisfaction is directly correlated to compensation. That ultimately is what matters most, especially to line staff. Therefore, organisations that choose to retain earnings, pay higher stock dividends, or invest in expensive infrastructural projects in lieu of reinvesting in their most valuable asset — their team members — stand the risk of losing them to companies that recognise and value them enough to pay them what they’re worth.

Notwithstanding, many HR professionals struggle to access accurate or recent compensation information to create competitive compensation packages. Companies like Birches Group help to provide this type of accurate and up to date compensation data which managers can use to create competitive packages.

NO ROMANCE WITHOUT FINANCE

On the other side of the fence — where employers are concerned — job security as it used to be known is a thing of the past. Now it’s mostly about, what have you done for me lately? The concept may sound reprehensible to more seasoned campaigners, but the truth is that many organisations are no longer bound by that unspoken contract — that “we will do our best to ensure your job security and compensate you equitably”. The sad reality is that one day you will have a job and next week 500 employees are cut in rationalisation exercises designed to make the company more agile and efficient — which, in English, means you’re fired.

But people aren’t stupid; not most of us anyway. When staff members see the company’s profitability booming, new locations opening, managers’ motor vehicles being upgraded, they begin to ask questions, like, “What about me? Where’s my pay raise? I want nice things too!”

And you know what ultimately suffers the most from this situation, the company they USED TO work for. That’s when manager’s scramble for advice from HR service professionals about how to keep their best and brightest. No wonder many in the job market have become occupational mercenaries, ruthlessly seeking new opportunities when their future with their current employer looks bleak. It then becomes a case of ‘do unto others BEFORE they do unto you’. Thank you, next…

Until next time, leaders keep lookin’ up!

 

 

Read more

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/career-education/what-s-love-got-to-do-with-it-_175319?profile=1270

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03 Jun 2019

Who run the world? by Debra Fraser

My, how things and times have changed. If you went into a coma about five or so years ago and just regained consciousness, you’d be surprised at the updates regarding the progress made on gender equality in particular. One needs to look no further than the #MeToo movement started in the US. In countries like Italy, where old customs still dictate and limit women’s involvement in economics and politics, they’re starting to feel the effects of nearly half their population being limited in their contribution to national development because, let’s be clear, it’s no longer just about gender; it’s about economics.

 

Right Person For The Job

Going are the days when phrases like ‘this is a man’s job’ are taken seriously. The past 50 years have proven that gender has very little to do with aptitude. It’s been tried, tested and proven that attitude is the key ingredient to achievement and upward mobility. That, and good old-fashioned smarts and hard work. So, in addition to expanding their views on workplace diversity at various levels, forward-thinking companies are now recognising the critical importance of finding the right person for the right job at the right time. This may be especially challenging to accomplish internally when the culture itself is in flux and may require external partnership from an HR service provider or even a workforce management company. As with Affirmative Action in the United States, legislating change and employment quotas can make a difference. However, since privately-owned companies in particular can self-determine who they want to hire without external oversight, many firms are turning to executive search partners to find the best and brightest yes, but also those whose core beliefs complement the organisation’s culture and strategic goals.

Girl Power

A word for our local super heroes. Our most decorated Olympian is also a woman — Merlene Ottey. Jamaica’s first Olympic gold medallist is also a woman — Deon Hemmings. Since then, Veronica Campbell-Brown, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and others have blazed a trail on the track. More recently, Alia Atkinson has been literally making waves with her consistently outstanding performances in the pool. And in a few days, Jamaica’s Reggae Girlz begin their maiden adventure at the Fifa World Cup, playing their opening game against none other than Brazil.

More and more, globally and locally, women have staked their claim to top leadership roles in sports, business, and politics. From Portia Simpson-Miller to Audrey Marks and countless other phenomenal women, companies, and governments are realising that you marginalise any group really, but especially half the population, at your own risk. The recently constituted South African parliament proves that some are getting it right; half the representatives are women. Canada gets that too in the composition of Justin Trudeau’s Government with strong representation by minorities and women. It’s full time we recognise that our organisational and national sustainability will ultimately depend on everybody pulling their own weight, regardless of gender, political affiliation or religious beliefs.

 

Until next time, leaders, keep lookin’ up!

 

Read more

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/career-education/who-run-the-world-_166240?profile=1270

 

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25 Mar 2019

Employee happiness = business profitability

Because I’m Happy

Happy is not in the lexicon of what is considered the usual business lingo. We’re more accustomed to talking about profitability, efficiency and sustainability. Ironically, for those key factors to be in the ideal optimum state, employee welfare and engagement must be a priority for any forward-thinking organisation. This brings into focus the oft-blurred lines between corporate objectives and clearly aligned hiring and on-boarding best practices. This is also where HR practitioners excel, or ought to anyway, by helping senior management employ holistic hiring solutions with employee contentment as a priority.

Workplace harmony

Let’s get one thing straight: as much as companies strive to be the coolest place to work and be revered for their compensation and benefits package, it is, above everything else, a place where services are exchanged for payment. That’s the primary reason organisations conduct executive searches or hire HR consulting firms — to help them find the best and brightest. Keeping them on board is another story. It’s not lost on managers that with strategic succession planning in mind, they must maintain the interest of young hires who are increasingly more into personal development and instant gratification. But how does a leader strike that tricky balance between getting their pound of flesh and creating a family centric culture that encourages employees to act in the company’s best interest as if they were the CEO and founder? Many start-ups go as far as offering stock options or up the ante with paternity leave and on-site childcare or gym amenities. The fact is that organisations are awakening to the stark realities of competing for the loyalty of their internal customers almost as much as they do for external ones.

Business model

The subheading alludes to the framework and peculiar strategic objectives of any given company. In this instance, though, I’m referring to a model business environment, one that sets a standard for how team members are given primacy in one of the areas that matter most — their physical workspace. Over the last decade or so, much has been made of some high-profile examples of uber trendy, downright cool places to work. If you Googled ‘cool places to work’, Google itself would probably pop up as a top search item. As self-serving as that may seem, it’s also reputed to be true. The same can be said for Facebook and other open-floor designed corporate spaces — where enclosed offices are often seen as closed-off communication, and jeans, trendy tees and sneakers are the new normal for office attire. A local example of an international brand that employs this approach in some respect is Vistaprint. But don’t be fooled by the facade of employee chill-out areas, flashy paint jobs, or mini-gyms. Creating a ‘happy’ environment for your team members is never just about stylish or lavish amenities. It starts and ends with a genuine appreciation for the value and contribution each team member brings to the table, and backing that up at every level of their engagement and compensation.

Debra Fraser, MBA is CEO of Caribbean HR Solutions, a board member of the Business Process Industry Association of Jamaica, a member of the Human Resource Management Association of Jamaica, and a member of the Society of Human Resources Management in the US. Please direct comments to dfraser@caribbeanhrsolutions.com

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http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/career-education/employee-happiness-business-profitability_160261?profile=127

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18 Dec 2018

Trump: a lesson for leaders by Debra Fraser

Yes, leaders, let’s go there.

But before we do, remember this: We are all students of life, and as leaders, it is crucial for us to lead a learning lifestyle; that practice of learning from everything — the good, the bad, and the ugly. To have times of reflection when you evaluate the bigger picture — causes and effects — so that you can see what changes are required to ensure success. To create smart strategies to break cyclical errors and recognize, even prompt those ‘aha’ moments on how to standardize best practices for sustainable profitability. All of this is learning at the leadership level and forms the basis for continuous improvement in any sphere of life. Your ability or inability to learn impacts you, your teams, and all those within your scope of influence.

So, what then can we learn from The Donald?

Regardless of whether you are a Trump fan or not, one thing is undeniable: his actions and characteristics are nothing shy of incredibly bold! Here’s how Wikipedia defines this characteristic: it is “the quality of having a strong, vivid, or clear appearance”.

Boldness is about the energy and conviction you portray to those around you. It is what draws people’s attention to buy what you are selling. It is Usain Bolt’s jig at the build-up to a 100-metre race, and the swagger in Barack Obama’s walk.

It smells like confidence (though it can be a sign of its deficiency) and thus is prone to popularisation even if it is devoid of integrity, truth, or effectiveness. But even while it may be completely disconnected from values, boldness sill retains its powerful impact.

Let’s jump from one extreme (politics) to the other (religion). The book of Proverbs 28:1 states: “The righteous are as bold as a lion.”

A simple definition of righteous: rightness, or consistently doing what is right, yet another leadership discipline. Regardless of your religious persuasion, this verse is a challenge to leaders – especially middle managers.

Have I chosen the right job that suits my natural gifts, passion and purpose? Am I making the right decisions for my team and company; choosing the longer, tougher path in order to ensure success? Am I doing the ethical thing even when noone is watching? And finally, when I am practising ‘rightness’, am I doing so with boldness? Am I confidently representing what my team is all about; creating my own jig and swagger?

With our Government’s aggressive 2020 economic goals just ahead and in anticipation of the associated learning that will accompany this challenge, let us as leaders become bold about what we are in fact doing right.

Until next time, leaders keep lookin’ up!

Debra Fraser, MBA is CEO of Caribbean HR Solutions; board member of the Business Process Industry of Jamaica; member of the Human Resource Management Association of Jamaica; and member of the Society of Human Resources Management in the US. Please direct comments to dfraser@caribbeanhrsolutions.com

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13 Dec 2018

Why you should outsource your recruitment

Recruiting a new member of staff can be a time consuming task and hiring decisions shouldn’t be taken lightly. You need to think realistically whether your team have the time an expertise to find the best individual to join your business.

If the answer is no, then you may want to consider outsourcing your recruitment. After all, it is a recruiters job to find the best candidate available, so they will be equipped with the experience and resources to fill the position quickly and efficiently.

If you’re not sure about whether you should outsource your recruitment or not, here are a few reasons it could benefit you.

1) Focus can remain on business

Taking time out to focus on recruiting new employees can result in neglecting your usual job, that could be important to the running of the company. By outsourcing your recruitment, you can leave the job to the recruiter while you attend to your usual business.

2) Improve the quality of hires

You may find that you have trouble finding and recruiting qualified candidates by yourself and this isn’t necessarily a reflection of your company or the salary being offered, and rather an indication that you aren’t searching in the right place. Recruiters are experts at seeking out the best candidates on the market. They know where to look, what qualities to look for in an individual and how best to approach people about a job; making them qualified to speed up the process and improve the quality of hires.

3) Reduce costs

Hiring can be expensive. From the labour required, to posting ads on job boards and conducting background screening, the costs can really mount up quickly. By using a recruitment agency the cost is all rolled into one, so could reduce spending in the long run. Outsourcing recruitment can also save staffing costs of an in-house recruitment team, as well as reducing the chance of losing money to a bad hire.

4) Keep up with demand

Fast growing companies may find it hard to keep up with the recruitment needs and demands that they are facing, as they don’t have the time and resources to manage it in house. Recruitment agencies will be better qualified for handling a high volume of roles at one time, as well as having the advantage of being able to dedicate all of their time to it, rather than juggling it alongside other duties.

5) Reduce turnover rate

A poorly run recruitment process could be to blame for a high turnover rate which can have financial implications for a business, as well a disruptions to productivity and ongoing projects. A high turnover may not necessarily be a reflection on your company in general, as it may just indicate that candidates just aren’t a very good fit for the company, would could come as a result of a poor recruitment process. Recruiters are well practiced in assessing what kind of people will be suitable for a certain role and the company culture, so could assist in placing individuals who are better suited to the business and will stay in the job for longer.

Caribbean HR Solutions are proud to support you in your recruiting outsourcing needs. Call us at 1-876-971-7632 or email sales@caribbeanhrsolutions.com.

Taken from

5 Reasons Why Companies Should Outsource Their Recruitment

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04 Dec 2018

Business versus ‘busyness’ at Christmas Time by Debra Fraser

With Christmas fast approaching, everyone is feeling the happy, but hectic crunch of the holiday season. For business leaders, who are people too, this can mean unmanageable stress and even failure as yuletide stress is compounded by spikes in seasonal business — trying to reach end-of-year goals, activate Christmas sales campaigns, and execute last-minute strategies to close the year in the black and not the red (no offence, Rudolph).

Add to this already long list of extra to-dos, the festive responsibilities of house and home — planning social events, family get-togethers, and gift-giving — all of which come with additional costs of time, money, and attention. Hats off to those who have also committed to physical challenges of ‘getting in shape’ for the new year to fit into that dress or suit at the staff holiday party. So much extra pressure! It’s enough to make the ‘Happy Holidays’ feel not so happy.

As leaders, if your load is too heavy, or your mood too low, your entire team feels it, and so do their families. Bear that in mind.

There’s a reason why governments mandate holiday time off. It’s to ensure that “busYness” doesn’t keep people so busy that they don’t get to enjoy life. The responsibility for ensuring this work-life balance lies in the laps of all business leaders.

What’s the difference between business and “busyness”, you ask? Well we all know what business is. So here’s a definition of its first cousin, “busYness”, from the Urban Dictionary. “Busyness” is to have more to do than you can handle.

Leadership advice: just because you ‘see’ that it needs to be done, doesn’t mean it has to be done now. Wise leaders have used November to prioritise only what must be done in December. If you’ve not yet done so, here are examples of things you may be able to nix from December’s objectives:

• Meeting with prospects that are unlikely to purchase

• Internal projects and meetings that can be deferred

• “Helping out” in areas that are outside of your expertise.

 

But in your cutting back, there are key items that must be prioritised. For example:

• Key KPI’s ONLY IF they can reasonably be closed off

• Sales tasks ONLY IF they contribute to new clients or retention

• Reports and special projects ONLY IF they are for your boss(es)

• High-touch social events ONLY IF they serve to strengthen key relationships.

The lists above are not at all comprehensive, but are guidelines towards achieving balance for you and all those you impact. This Christmas, find ways to keep the “I” smack in the middle of Business.

Until next time, leaders keep lookin’ up!

 

Debra Fraser, MBA, is CEO of Caribbean HR Solutions, a board member of the BPIAJ, and a member of the Human Resource Management Association of Jamaica, and Society of Human Resources Management. Please direct comments to dfraser@caribbeanhrsolutions.com or www.caribbeanhrsolutions.com

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29 Nov 2018

Improving Candidate Experience

Let’s face it – The hiring process is stressful for both sides. The job seeker is putting their talents and career future on the line, which is a vulnerable place to be. The organization is investing considerable resources in hopes of finding a star in the making. This is important stuff.

 And yet far too many organizations make a mess out of the candidate experience in the recruiting process. This is astonishing and just plain self-destructive.

In other words, a good candidate experience is brilliant marketing for an organization; a bad one is an ongoing black eye for people interested in your employer brand. Devastating as that is, this fact is even worse: a bad hiring experience may cause the right applicant to turn down the job. Top talent has no desire to work in a disrespectful organization with leaders who simply don’t care about the recruiting process.

Savvy organizations turn HR into a powerhouse marketing and recruiting tool. Here are some steps you can take to follow their lead:

1) Walk in the job seeker’s shoes. We’ve all been job seekers at some point in our careers. As you design or improve your hiring process, keep the applicant experience front and center at all times. Yes, this is about fulfilling your organization’s needs, but the more you understand and design the process from the applicant’s point of view, the more successful you will be. Role-playing can be invaluable here. Have a team member play an applicant as you design each step of your process.

2) Communicate. Remember that disgraceful statistic: over 70 percent of online applicants never even get a form reply. This is often a symptom of dysfunctional Leadership and HR; it violates the rules of common human courtesy and smart communication. You must explain every step of the hiring process to an applicant. Always meet the deadlines and markers you have established. If for some unforeseeable reason, you’re unable to, communicate that swiftly and directly to the applicant. Stay transparent and honest all the way through.

3) Bring employees in the process. Jobs don’t exist in a vacuum. You want to hire people who are going to mesh with your culture. The best way to ensure this is to seek employee input in designing and implementing your hiring. A fresh pair of eyes can sometimes provide just the insight you’re seeking. And consider having promising candidates meet with their possible future teammates to gauge workplace culture fit. Too many HR departments want to guard their culture against the world. That’s a mistake. Moliere once said: “I take my good where I find it.” He’s one smart guy.

4) Personalize the recruiting process. You’ve heard me say it again and again: when it comes organizations and their people, one size fits no one. You want a hiring process that has built-in flexibility, not rigid rules. Some of the best talent is idiosyncratic, eccentric and maybe even a bit weird (exhibit A: Steve Jobs). The last thing you want is a process that eliminates stellar talent for bureaucratic reasons. Yes, a college degree is nice, but is it really the key determinant of an applicant’s future performance? Methinks not.

Hiring lies at the very heart of HR and Leadership. When candidates are hired after a positive experience, they hit the ground running, their commitment to your organization having been nurtured and strengthened during every step of the process. When candidates aren’t hired, they walk away feeling respected and appreciated, and are far more likely to recommend other talent look into your organization. This is world-class HR. And you can make it happen!

 

Read more

https://www.forbes.com/sites/meghanbiro/2013/12/08/5-tips-for-a-winning-candidate-experience/#6ef020891ee5

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05 Nov 2018

Return of The Invisible Man by Debra Fraser

Anyone over age 50 may remember the television series from the 1960s, The Invisible Man. It’s the story of British scientist Peter Brady who, while working on an invisibility formula, suffers a tragic accident and inadvertently turns himself invisible. Eventually, Peter uses the tragic illness for good and becomes an unbeatable superhero — a fantastic ending for every show. Sadly, however, in the real world of work, being invisible is an all too common experience for many staff members. And the endings for them? Well, not so fantastic.

Take Mark, for example. He spent the last year formulating new marketing reports to measure the effectiveness of his company’s client retention efforts. His efforts jump-started a 35 per cent increase in retention figures in just one year. Walking by the coffee station at work, he overhears an executive speaking with his boss, “Ask the guy who does the reports to print a few copies for the office.” The “guy”? He winced. Despite his year-long efforts he still wasn’t seen as a person… just as another spoke in the corporate wheel.

People just want to be seen, zeen?

They need to be seen, acknowledged by their peers, and mostly by their bosses. Recognition is the simple discipline of seeing people — not just what they do or their results, but who they are. And this is personal. Most companies take the short cut approach in attempting to check this box by running employee of the month, tenure, and service awards programmes. They are called “programmes” because they are programmed into the regular schedule of company events. To go further, there are now recognition companies specialising in automating these programmes so that at the click of a button one manager (usually in-sourced to the HR manager) can pull names from a productivity report, load them into a recognition system and voila! Instant recognition programme! No genuine human connection required. It can be almost, well… inhumane.

Interesting stats: 50 per cent of satisfaction comes from an employee’s relations with his/her supervisor. Seventy nine per cent of staff who leave the organisation do so due to a lack of recognition or appreciation. And a whopping two-thirds of employees report receiving no recognition for good work in the past year. They are invisible.

Recognition coming directly from the direct supervisor is the most valued ingredient in motivating and retaining employees. As an HR outsourcer my company provides significant value to companies who outsource their non-core functions to us, such as payroll, HR programming, engagement surveys. But outsourcing — or in-sourcing — the personal side of any core business process is NEVER a good practice.

Effective leaders practise a daily habit of recognising the employees behind the work and express gratitude, continuously. They bring the so-called invisible people into full view.

Until next time, leaders, keep lookin’ up!

Debra Fraser, MBA is CEO of Caribbean HR Solutions, a board member of the BPIAJ, and a member of the Human Resource Management Association of Jamaica and Society of Human Resources Management. Please direct comments to dfraser@caribbeanhrsolutions.com or www.caribbeanhrsolutions.com

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01 Nov 2018

Can Psychometric Assessments help me find the right person for the job?

Choosing the right person for the job has long been a problem that many employers have struggled to address. Poor selection may have disastrous consequences for both the employee and the organisation. From the organisation’s perspective, the cost of hiring and training an inappropriate candidate can be very high in terms of lost productivity and revenue, reduced efficiency, increased absenteeism, reduced morale, the cost of the selection process itself and the cost of retraining new personnel. From the employee’s perspective, being selected for the “wrong” job may have consequences ranging from loss of motivation, reduced job satisfaction, increased work stress, failure to progress in their career, to more clinical manifestations such as depression and anxiety.

Employers have attempted to resolve the selection problem by using a variety of methods to aid selection accuracy. However, over the years many of these have been “faddish” and lacking in predictive validity. Today, methods such as hand writing analysis, astrology and reliance upon written references (that inevitably praise the candidate) have given way to more valid methods.

Numerous studies have shown that modern psychometric assessment is one of the most valid predictors of future job performance. With increasing frequency, employers are now turning to psychometric testing to aid in selection decisions as well as evaluation of personnel.

Why use psychometric assessments?

  • Objectivity – good psychometric assessments are standardised on a large sample and provide normative data across a wide range of demographics and age cohorts. Well selected tests will allow you to demonstrate talents that may otherwise not be evident.
  • Validity – psychometric assessments are a more valid method than interviews, academic achievement & reference checks, and when utilised in combination (for example in an assessment centre) are highly predictive of future job performance.
  • Cost – the cost of selection errors is large for both the employer and the employee. Psychometric assessments help to minimise costs while maximising potential fit between the candidate and the job.

So what exactly is psychometric assessment?

A tool to aid in the candidate selection and decision making process.

Psychometric tests do not and should not stand alone as the only selection method.

Psychometric tests are carefully developed for specific purposes and need to be utilised for the purpose for which they were intended. The tests used in the selection setting are purpose designed to help fit your talents, personality and attributes to a job that suits you. They are not designed to reveal your innermost secrets or uncover confidential information about you.

Reputable tests have undergone rigorous research before being released, and published technical manuals provide research evidence of their reliability and validity for specific purposes.

Caribbean HR Solutions are proud to be a provide support with Psychometric Assessments and all other support for your hiring needs. For more information contact us at 1-876-971-7632 or email us at sales@caribbeanhrsolutions.com.

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22 Oct 2018

Managing the workplace zombie by Debra Fraser

“I see dead people”. At work. Duppies, zombies, ghosts, whichever term you prefer. People who are there but not really there…or are they? (Cue spooky music…).

Workplace zombies are those who are disengaged from their companies and their jobs, but still show up for work. They clock-in and clock-out. Present in body but not in spirit; listlessly satisfying the requirements or ‘letter’ of the job, but avoiding any spirited connection with the company’s purpose, mission and people. They were once ‘fully human’, bringing their energy, ideas, and genuine loyalty to their place of work and teams. So what happened to them? What force sapped the life out of these formerly productive souls?

Reasons

As a research project of interest, I had my team conduct a survey to find out what drives individuals to jump off the bridge into zombie-ism. Here are some of the common reasons:

• “The company doesn’t care about me”

This sentiment is voiced by workers who held the company in high esteem when they first joined the organisation. Over time, however, an event or series of events occurred in which the employee’s high expectations were not met. For example, a manager fails to respond fairly or compassionately to an employee’s legitimate personal crisis or need. The employee disengages, emotionally, but due to the monetary rewards, continues to show up to work.

 

• “I don’t like the type of job I’m in”

Here, the employee accepted the job, and after some time, discovered that it does not fit his/her natural abilities and expectations. Due to the unavailability of a ‘better’ job, the employee disengages, mentally, but continues to show up to work until a new opportunity, or funds to attend training for the new opportunity, presents itself.

• “I’m not rewarded fairly for my job”

Here, the individual believes that the pay received is not commensurate with the work performed, so in short, they are being ripped off. Disengagement occurs and ‘another one bites the dust’.

Why should companies care about zombie-ism or seek to combat it? Because it costs them, literally! Several studies have shown that disengaged workers, similar to sick workers (google “Presenteeism”), who still come in to work perform at a slower pace, make more errors, and negatively impact the productivity of their coworkers. The net result is that the company would be more profitable if both sick and disengaged workers stayed home until they were well, or resurrected!

The discussion on workplace zombies continues this week as the Jamaica Business Development Commission hosts its annual Employee Engagement Conference, an event where hundreds of Jamaica’s CEOs and decision-makers meet to discuss the causes, impact and responses of having an engaged workforce.

Debra Fraser MBA, is CEO of Caribbean HR Solutions, and is a board memberof the Business Process Industry Association of Jamaica, and a member ofthe Human Resource Management Association of Jamaica as well as theSociety of Human Resources Management. Please direct comments todfraser@caribbeanhrsolutions.com or www.caribbeanhrsolutions.com

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